Web-based Quality Management Game

Understanding the basic concepts of production planning and control is easy – grasping their complex interrelationships is hard.

We are currently developing a business simulation game aimed at conveying aspects of production planning and control and quality management that should accompany lectures and exercises at our university.

As we want to understand what people like you think about this game-based approach we kindly ask you to participate in a user study on the game. This study is composed of three parts:

The many faces of (digital) Game-Based Learning in Manufacturing and Business

In a recent conference talk at the International Conference on Competitive Manufacturing I presented how Serious Games and Business Simulation Games can be used

  • to Understand task relevant human factors
  • to Measure aptitude and potential of employees
  • to Train prospective or current employees
  • and as a benchmark for evaluating user interfaces

To validate these keen assumptions, we developed a set of serious games. Currently, we are evaluating a fascinating game about production planning and control (PPC) and quality management (QM). You can support us by participating and playing two rounds of "Quality-Intelligence Game" right in your browser (the game is in german, though):

Link to the game: qm-game.de (in german)

Dict.cc Plugin for OS X discontinued

Apple finally decided to include an english-german dictionary with the newest version of Mac OS X 10.11 “El capitan”. I cannot yet judge whether Apple’s dataset can compete with the collective power of the active dict.cc community, but as maintaining my plugin for the same purpose got increasingly difficult through the exponential growth of the database, I decided to discontinue the dict.cc plugin. You can still download the plugin via this site or directly at dict.cc, but new versions will not be released.

Broken or not?

Science isn’t broken is a marvelous article on science, careless data interpretation, and the cult of publishing only significant results.

In the last two nibbles on this site I linked to articles that criticized the practice of “p-hacking” and illustrated the “conformation bias (/node/2108)” that – in combination – lead to innumerable bogus scientific research papers and an increasing number of serious scientific outlets that start to change their review and publication policies.

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